Latest Posts

Wheel Bearing Noise vs Tire Noise

What do you do when a customer brings you a vehicle with a roaring or howling noise coming from a wheel? In most cases, it can be coming from a worn tire, or a worn bearing. It is not easy to tell, but there are ways to determine what is causing the problem. First, test […]

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5 Telltale Signs of A Worn Wheel Hub Bearing

A worn wheel hub bearing is a pretty big deal. If you let it go on long enough, the wheel could literally fall off while you’re driving. That could cause a catastrophic accident that puts your life and others’ lives at risk. That’s why it’s important to watch out for the signs of a worn […]

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3 Reasons Fleets Should Encourage U-Joint Replacement

For fleet managers, one of the keys to success is cost efficiency. Cost efficiency is a pretty simple concept. It simply means that your fleet performs reliably with the lowest possible overall maintenance and repair costs. Preventive maintenance is key to achieving cost efficiency.

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U-Joints: When In Doubt, Change It Out

U-joints should last the life of the vehicle, but that’s not always the case. Some u-joints fail from normal wear and tear, especially on vehicles that are frequently used for heavy towing or off-roading. U-joints can also fail as a result of misalignment, corrosion, or excessive vibration.

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How Maintenance Free U-Joints Will Save You Money

The auto industry is one of the fastest evolving industries in the world. We’re always sitting at the edge of our seats with all the new innovations hitting the market on a regular basis. One of the neatest innovations we’ve ever seen are maintenance free u-joints.

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U-Joint Failure Modes & Troubleshooting

The universal joint (U-joint) is a common part found on any rear-wheel drive or four-wheel drive vehicle, especially body-on-frame designs such as trucks and SUVs. The U-joint’s purpose is to transfer power to the driveshaft when the transmission and axle are at differing planes (heights). U-joints are always in pairs, usually at either end of […]

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